[blockquote]The scientists at Germany’s BioNTech (BNTX) who helped develop a coronavirus jab with US pharma company Pfizer (PFE) have used the same technology to develop a vaccine which they say cures multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice.

Both use a piece of genetic material called mRNA that is injected into a person's arm and forces the body's cells to produce a protein that help against the respective diseases for which the jab has been developed.



In the case of COVID-19, if a person later contracts the disease, the immune system is able to quickly fight it by creating antibodies before the virus can spread.

BioNTech CEO Ugur Sahin led research showing that an mRNA vaccine might also work in multiple sclerosis, Fierce Biotech, a pharma news outlet, reported.

Sahin's team showed that an mRNA vaccine encoding a disease-related autoantigen successfully improved MS symptoms in sick animals and prevented disease progression in rodents showing early signs of MS.

Sahin, along with colleagues at BioNTech and scientists at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, hypothesised that an mRNA vaccine could help the immune system tolerate specific MS-related proteins without compromising normal immune function.

With the MS vaccine, the mRNA technology stops the body's immune system from attacking neurons in the brain and spinal cord which can lead to the loss of bodily function.

Clinical trials on mice revealed the jab not only stopped the disease from progressing but restored some motor skills which had been lost.

The German startup has been at the forefront of the vaccine race.

[/blockquote]

https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/biontech-pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-multiple-sclerosis-160017529.html
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Is this evidence that the 5-10 years worth of immediate vaccine research done in just 1 year for covid will have broad reaching effects?


I was reading about how these new vaccines use mRNA, amazing stuff really.

When science really comes together it’s a wonder
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[quote mentionsUser="4433" postId="680886" threadPage="1" threadId="20192" username="Kite_shugo"]Is this evidence that the 5-10 years worth of immediate vaccine research done in just 1 year for covid will have broad reaching effects?


I was reading about how these new vaccines use mRNA, amazing stuff really.

When science really comes together it’s a wonder[/quote]
Don’t forget what it took to get here, a pandemic.

We could’ve been here sooner if healthcare companies weren’t so complacent.
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[quote mentionsUser="200" postId="680914" threadPage="1" threadId="20192" username="chipsnapper"]Don’t forget what it took to get here, a pandemic.

This could’ve been done long ago if healthcare companies weren’t so complacent.[/quote]

Also don't forget that the research itself is the result of decades of work in the field.

The difference between the discovery of theory and actually applying it in practice is, and always has been, funding.
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mRNA vaccinology and associated research is, imo, one of the greatest advances in medicine in human history. The implications their robusticity and flexibility have for future pandemics and disease prevention in general is potentially astounding. It's like going into WWII with biplanes and coming out the other side with jet engines.
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Tbh we're very lucky we got mRNA right when covid because otherwise we would have to wait even longer with the traditional vaccine
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[quote mentionsUser="2990" postId="680922" threadPage="1" threadId="20192" username="Desaster56"]Also don't forget that the research itself is the result of decades of work in the field.

The difference between the discovery of theory and actually applying it in practice is, and always has been, funding.[/quote]

Exactly. The concept has been around for decades. It just took the pandemic to push it into mainstream acceptance. Who knows how long it would've taken for them to break out of experimental without the immediate global necessity. Hopefully knowing they work will open the flood gates in terms of the variety of vaccines and speed we can develop them.
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[quote mentionsUser="236" postId="680944" threadPage="1" threadId="20192" username="OvB"]Exactly. The concept has been around for decades. It just took the pandemic to push it into mainstream acceptance. Who knows how long it would've taken for them to break out of experimental without the immediate global necessity. Hopefully knowing they work will open the flood gates in terms of the variety of vaccines and speed we can develop them.[/quote]

Potentially worse pandemics could absolutely come along in our lifetimes, so hopefully a silver lining of the COVID pandemic can be actually having a solid system of preparedness in place for responding to future outbreaks much quicker.
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This is good news. Biotechnica is definitely not the worst of the corpos.

[img]https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2lNzAg0brDM/maxresdefault.jpg[/img]

I just wish guarding their crops wasn't so boring.
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Mice aren't humans, but damn I wish this turns out to work. A good friend got MS just about a year ago, and the outlook is just rough. Don't want to see her end up in a wheelchair, and well, eventually a bed.
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[quote mentionsUser="5075" postId="680875" threadPage="1" threadId="20192" username="Ignhelper"]
Clinical trials on mice revealed the jab not only stopped the disease from progressing but restored some motor skills which had been lost.
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As someone affected by MS, this seems too amazing to be true. We're talking about Mice here, I suspect the vast complex network of nerves in humans could have a severely lessened effect of restoration.

But if this works? Merely stopping the progression is like a divine gift.

'twas 16 when I was diagnosed, when I was 17 I woke up one morning and was severely depressed due to an overnight inflammation that cropped up. It was cured within a week (Which was a sort of relevatory period), but the mere thought of things happening to your brain without you noticing or being able to affect it is scary as hell. Ever since then I've been living my life in such a way that if it gets worse again, there's someone there who knows and can get me treatment. I've resigned at the age of 16 to the fact that, if I ever own a home, it shouldn't have stairs.

Even if this vaccine will freeze the progress of MS at the state you are in when you get it, it'll be a huge mental relief for pretty much everyone affected, ontop of the obvious physical benefits.

And also, if this works for MS in humans, what kind of other neurodegenerative diseases can we treat now? Sure, MS is an autoimmune disease hence why a vaccine re-priming the immune system would sort of work, but where will this lead?

Amazing stepping stone for medical science. Am going to track this - naturally, since the treating neurologist would mention it sooner or later. Definitely excited, but not gonna get my hopes irresponsibly high. Mice aren't men. Ain't no use in stopping MS if the vaccine causes you acute liver failure or something.
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The only part I don't like is the likely outcome that anything new in the mRNA area will go back to the old drawn out tests.
I really hope that the pandemic might keep some of the parallel trials or other speed ups with the paperwork.

At the very least the funding should be mostly secured for BioNTech to go after those other diseases.
As well as the increased interest in this tech, seeing that Moderna also uses the same approach, so more companies might try to tackle other diseases.

Shoutout to the Knockout Folding@home team in hopes that we helped a bit
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this is big if it leads somewhere. i've known people diagnosed with ms and it is truly horrible for them to go through that.